History and the Homeric Iliad

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online History and the Homeric Iliad file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with History and the Homeric Iliad book. Happy reading History and the Homeric Iliad Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF History and the Homeric Iliad at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF History and the Homeric Iliad Pocket Guide.

Your request to send this item has been completed. APA 6th ed. Note: Citations are based on reference standards. However, formatting rules can vary widely between applications and fields of interest or study.


  1. Homer - Facts, Iliad & Odyssey - Biography.
  2. Cooking the Indian Way: To Include New Low-Fat and Vegetarian Recipes (Easy Menu Ethnic Cookbooks).
  3. The Modern Management of Mental Handicap: A Manual of Practice.
  4. Eeny Meeny.
  5. History and the Homeric Iliad by Page D L?
  6. Essentials of Microeconomics;

The specific requirements or preferences of your reviewing publisher, classroom teacher, institution or organization should be applied. The E-mail Address es field is required. Please enter recipient e-mail address es. The E-mail Address es you entered is are not in a valid format. Please re-enter recipient e-mail address es. You may send this item to up to five recipients. The name field is required. Please enter your name.

The E-mail message field is required. Please enter the message. Please verify that you are not a robot. Would you also like to submit a review for this item? You already recently rated this item. Your rating has been recorded. Write a review Rate this item: 1 2 3 4 5. Preview this item Preview this item. Series: Sather classical lectures , v. Subjects Homer. Achilles -- Mythological character -- In literature. Oral tradition -- Greece. View all subjects More like this Similar Items. Allow this favorite library to be seen by others Keep this favorite library private.

Find a copy in the library Finding libraries that hold this item Denys Lionel , History and the Homeric Iliad. Reviews User-contributed reviews Add a review and share your thoughts with other readers. Men and their gods continually speak of heroic acceptance and cowardly avoidance of one's slated fate. No, deadly destiny, with the son of Leto, has killed me, and of men it was Euphorbos; you are only my third slayer. And put away in your heart this other thing that I tell you. You yourself are not one who shall live long, but now already death and powerful destiny are standing beside you, to go down under the hands of Aiakos' great son, Achilleus.

Here, Patroclus alludes to fated death by Hector's hand, and Hector's fated death by Achilles's hand. Each accepts the outcome of his life, yet, no-one knows if the gods can alter fate. The first instance of this doubt occurs in Book XVI. Seeing Patroclus about to kill Sarpedon , his mortal son, Zeus says:.


  1. Project MUSE - History versus the Homeric Iliad : A View from the Ionian Islands.
  2. Scott Muellers Upgrading and Repairing Laptops, Second Edition;
  3. European Union Law For The Twenty-first Century: Rethinking The New Legal Order?
  4. Eastern Europe since 1945 (2nd Edition) (Making of the Modern World).

Ah me, that it is destined that the dearest of men, Sarpedon, must go down under the hands of Menoitios' son Patroclus. Majesty, son of Kronos, what sort of thing have you spoken? Do you wish to bring back a man who is mortal, one long since doomed by his destiny, from ill-sounding death and release him? Do it, then; but not all the rest of us gods shall approve you. In deciding between losing a son or abiding fate, Zeus, King of the Gods, allows it.

This motif recurs when he considers sparing Hector, whom he loves and respects. This time, it is Athene who challenges him:. Father of the shining bolt, dark misted, what is this you said? Again, Zeus appears capable of altering fate, but does not, deciding instead to abide set outcomes; similarly, fate spares Aeneas, after Apollo convinces the over-matched Trojan to fight Achilles. Poseidon cautiously speaks:. But come, let us ourselves get him away from death, for fear the son of Kronos may be angered if now Achilleus kills this man. It is destined that he shall be the survivor, that the generation of Dardanos shall not die Divinely aided, Aeneas escapes the wrath of Achilles and survives the Trojan War.

Whether or not the gods can alter fate, they do abide it, despite its countering their human allegiances; thus, the mysterious origin of fate is a power beyond the gods. Fate implies the primeval, tripartite division of the world that Zeus, Poseidon, and Hades effected in deposing their father, Cronus , for its dominion. Zeus took the Air and the Sky, Poseidon the Waters, and Hades the Underworld , the land of the dead—yet they share dominion of the Earth. Despite the earthly powers of the Olympic gods, only the Three Fates set the destiny of Man. For my mother Thetis the goddess of silver feet tells me I carry two sorts of destiny toward the day of my death.

Either, if I stay here and fight beside the city of the Trojans, my return home is gone, but my glory shall be everlasting; but if I return home to the beloved land of my fathers, the excellence of my glory is gone, but there will be a long life left for me, and my end in death will not come to me quickly. Translator Lattimore renders kleos aphthiton as forever immortal and as forever imperishable —connoting Achilles's mortality by underscoring his greater reward in returning to battle Troy. Kleos is often given visible representation by the prizes won in battle.

When Agamemnon takes Briseis from Achilles, he takes away a portion of the kleos he had earned. Achilles' shield, crafted by Hephaestus and given to him by his mother Thetis, bears an image of stars in the centre. The stars conjure profound images of the place of a single man, no matter how heroic, in the perspective of the entire cosmos. Yet the concept of homecoming is much explored in other Ancient Greek literature, especially in the post-war homeward fortunes experienced by the Atreidae Agamemnon and Menelaus , and Odysseus see the Odyssey. Pride drives the plot of the Iliad.

The Greeks gather on the plain of Troy to wrest Helen from the Trojans. Though the majority of the Trojans would gladly return Helen to the Greeks, they defer to the pride of their prince, Alexandros, also known as Paris. Within this frame, Homer's work begins. At the start of the Iliad, Agamemnon's pride sets forth a chain of events that leads him to take from Achilles, Briseis, the girl that he had originally given Achilles in return for his martial prowess.

Due to this slight, Achilles refuses to fight and asks his mother, Thetis, to make sure that Zeus causes the Greeks to suffer on the battlefield until Agamemnon comes to realize the harm he has done to Achilles. When in Book 9 his friends urge him to return, offering him loot and his girl, Briseis, he refuses, stuck in his vengeful pride. He overcomes his pride again when he keeps his anger in check and returns Hector to Priam at epic's close.

From epic start to epic finish, pride drives the plot.

The Iliad (Pope Translation)

In Book I, the Greek troubles begin with King Agamemnon's dishonorable, unkingly behavior—first, by threatening the priest Chryses 1. The warrior's consequent rancor against the dishonorable king ruins the Greek military cause. The epic takes as its thesis the anger of Achilles and the destruction it brings. Anger disturbs the distance between human beings and the gods. Uncontrolled anger destroys orderly social relationships and upsets the balance of correct actions necessary to keep the gods away from human beings.

Hybris forces Paris to fight against Menelaus. Agamemnon spurs the Greeks to fight, by calling into question Odysseus, Diomedes, and Nestor's pride, asking why they were cowering and waiting for help when they should be the ones leading the charge. King Agamemnon dishonours Chryses, the Trojan priest of Apollo, by refusing with a threat the restitution of his daughter, Chryseis—despite the proffered ransom of "gifts beyond count". Moreover, in that meeting, Achilles accuses Agamemnon of being "greediest for gain of all men".

But here is my threat to you. Even as Phoibos Apollo is taking away my Chryseis. I shall convey her back in my own ship, with my own followers; but I shall take the fair-cheeked Briseis, your prize, I myself going to your shelter, that you may learn well how much greater I am than you, and another man may shrink back from likening himself to me and contending against me. After that, only Athena stays Achilles's wrath. He vows to never again obey orders from Agamemnon. Furious, Achilles cries to his mother, Thetis, who persuades Zeus's divine intervention—favouring the Trojans—until Achilles's rights are restored.

Again, the Wrath of Achilles turns the war's tide in seeking vengeance when Hector kills Patroclus. Aggrieved, Achilles tears his hair and dirties his face.

Establishing the Text

Thetis comforts her mourning son, who tells her:. So it was here that the lord of men Agamemnon angered me. Still, we will let all this be a thing of the past, and for all our sorrow beat down by force the anger deeply within us. Now I shall go, to overtake that killer of a dear life, Hektor; then I will accept my own death, at whatever time Zeus wishes to bring it about, and the other immortals.

Accepting the prospect of death as fair price for avenging Patroclus, he returns to battle, dooming Hector and Troy, thrice chasing him 'round the Trojan walls, before slaying him, then dragging the corpse behind his chariot, back to camp. The poem dates to the archaic period of Classical Antiquity. Scholarly consensus mostly places it in the 8th century BC, although some favour a 7th-century date.

Herodotus , having consulted the Oracle at Dodona , placed Homer and Hesiod at approximately years before his own time, which would place them at c. The historical backdrop of the poem is the time of the Late Bronze Age collapse , in the early 12th century BC. Homer is thus separated from his subject matter by about years, the period known as the Greek Dark Ages. Intense scholarly debate has surrounded the question of which portions of the poem preserve genuine traditions from the Mycenaean period.

The Catalogue of Ships in particular has the striking feature that its geography does not portray Greece in the Iron Age , the time of Homer, but as it was before the Dorian invasion. Venetus A , copied in the 10th century AD, is the oldest fully extant manuscript of the Iliad. In antiquity, the Greeks applied the Iliad and the Odyssey as the bases of pedagogy. Literature was central to the educational-cultural function of the itinerant rhapsode , who composed consistent epic poems from memory and improvisation, and disseminated them, via song and chant, in his travels and at the Panathenaic Festival of athletics, music, poetics, and sacrifice, celebrating Athena 's birthday.

Originally, Classical scholars treated the Iliad and the Odyssey as written poetry, and Homer as a writer. Yet, by the s, Milman Parry — had launched a movement claiming otherwise. His investigation of the oral Homeric style—"stock epithets" and "reiteration" words, phrases, stanzas —established that these formulae were artifacts of oral tradition easily applied to a hexametric line. A two-word stock epithet e. In The Singer of Tales , Lord presents likenesses between the tragedies of the Greek Patroclus, in the Iliad , and of the Sumerian Enkidu , in the Epic of Gilgamesh , and claims to refute, with "careful analysis of the repetition of thematic patterns", that the Patroclus storyline upsets Homer's established compositional formulae of "wrath, bride-stealing, and rescue"; thus, stock-phrase reiteration does not restrict his originality in fitting story to rhyme.

James Armstrong reports that the poem's formulae yield richer meaning because the "arming motif" diction —describing Achilles, Agamemnon, Paris, and Patroclus—serves to "heighten the importance of In the Iliad , occasional syntactic inconsistency may be an oral tradition effect—for example, Aphrodite is "laughter-loving", despite being painfully wounded by Diomedes Book V, ; and the divine representations may mix Mycenaean and Greek Dark Age c. Despite Mycenae and Troy being maritime powers, the Iliad features no sea battles.

They enter battle in chariots , launching javelins into the enemy formations, then dismount—for hand-to-hand combat with yet more javelin throwing, rock throwing, and if necessary hand to hand sword and a shoulder-borne hoplon shield fighting. Ajax's cumbersome shield is more suitable for defence than for offence, while his cousin, Achilles, sports a large, rounded, octagonal shield that he successfully deploys along with his spear against the Trojans:. In describing infantry combat, Homer names the phalanx formation , [53] but most scholars do not believe the historical Trojan War was so fought.

The available evidence, from the Dendra armour and the Pylos Palace paintings, indicate the Mycenaeans used two-man chariots, with a long-spear-armed principal rider, unlike the three-man Hittite chariots with short-spear-armed riders, and unlike the arrow-armed Egyptian and Assyrian two-man chariots. Nestor spearheads his troops with chariots; he advises them:. Although Homer's depictions are graphic, it can be seen in the very end that victory in war is a far more somber occasion, where all that is lost becomes apparent. On the other hand, the funeral games are lively, for the dead man's life is celebrated.

This overall depiction of war runs contrary to many other [ citation needed ] ancient Greek depictions, where war is an aspiration for greater glory. While the Homeric poems the Iliad in particular were not necessarily revered scripture of the ancient Greeks, they were most certainly seen as guides that were important to the intellectual understanding of any educated Greek citizen. This is evidenced by the fact that in the late fifth century BC, "it was the sign of a man of standing to be able to recite the Iliad and Odyssey by heart.

In particular, the effect of epic literature can be broken down into three categories: tactics , ideology , and the mindset of commanders. In order to discern these effects, it is necessary to take a look at a few examples from each of these categories. Much of the detailed fighting in the Iliad is done by the heroes in an orderly, one-on-one fashion.

Much like the Odyssey , there is even a set ritual which must be observed in each of these conflicts. For example, a major hero may encounter a lesser hero from the opposing side, in which case the minor hero is introduced, threats may be exchanged, and then the minor hero is slain. The victor often strips the body of its armor and military accoutrements. There Telamonian Ajax struck down the son of Anthemion, Simoeisios in his stripling's beauty, whom once his mother descending from Ida bore beside the banks of Simoeis when she had followed her father and mother to tend the sheepflocks.

Therefore they called him Simoeisios; but he could not render again the care of his dear parents; he was short-lived, beaten down beneath the spear of high-hearted Ajax, who struck him as he first came forward beside the nipple of the right breast, and the bronze spearhead drove clean through the shoulder. The biggest issue in reconciling the connection between the epic fighting of the Iliad and later Greek warfare is the phalanx, or hoplite, warfare seen in Greek history well after Homer's Iliad.

While there are discussions of soldiers arrayed in semblances of the phalanx throughout the Iliad , the focus of the poem on the heroic fighting, as mentioned above, would seem to contradict the tactics of the phalanx. However, the phalanx did have its heroic aspects. The masculine one-on-one fighting of epic is manifested in phalanx fighting on the emphasis of holding one's position in formation. This replaces the singular heroic competition found in the Iliad. One example of this is the Spartan tale of picked men fighting against picked Argives. In this battle of champions, only two men are left standing for the Argives and one for the Spartans.

Othryades, the remaining Spartan, goes back to stand in his formation with mortal wounds while the remaining two Argives go back to Argos to report their victory. Thus, the Spartans claimed this as a victory, as their last man displayed the ultimate feat of bravery by maintaining his position in the phalanx. In terms of the ideology of commanders in later Greek history, the Iliad has an interesting effect.

The Iliad expresses a definite disdain for tactical trickery, when Hector says, before he challenges the great Ajax:. I know how to storm my way into the struggle of flying horses; I know how to tread the measures on the grim floor of the war god. Yet great as you are I would not strike you by stealth, watching for my chance, but openly, so, if perhaps I might hit you.

However, despite examples of disdain for this tactical trickery, there is reason to believe that the Iliad , as well as later Greek warfare, endorsed tactical genius on the part of their commanders. For example, there are multiple passages in the Iliad with commanders such as Agamemnon or Nestor discussing the arraying of troops so as to gain an advantage. This is even later referred to by Homer in the Odyssey. The connection, in this case, between guileful tactics of the Greeks in the Iliad and those of the later Greeks is not a difficult one to find.

Spartan commanders, often seen as the pinnacle of Greek military prowess, were known for their tactical trickery, and, for them, this was a feat to be desired in a commander. Indeed, this type of leadership was the standard advice of Greek tactical writers. Ultimately, while Homeric or epic fighting is certainly not completely replicated in later Greek warfare, many of its ideals, tactics, and instruction are.

Hans van Wees argues that the period that the descriptions of warfare relate can be pinned down fairly specifically—to the first half of the 7th century BC.

Ancient Greece for Kids: Homer's Iliad

The Iliad was a standard work of great importance already in Classical Greece and remained so throughout the Hellenistic and Byzantine periods. Subjects from the Trojan War were a favourite among ancient Greek dramatists. Aeschylus ' trilogy, the Oresteia , comprising Agamemnon , The Libation Bearers and The Eumenides , follows the story of Agamemnon after his return from the war. Homer also came to be of great influence in European culture with the resurgence of interest in Greek antiquity during the Renaissance , and it remains the first and most influential work of the Western canon.

In its full form the text made its return to Italy and Western Europe beginning in the 15th century, primarily through translations into Latin and the vernacular languages. Prior to this reintroduction, however, a shortened Latin version of the poem, known as the Ilias Latina , was very widely studied and read as a basic school text. The West tended to view Homer as unreliable as they believed they possessed much more down to earth and realistic eyewitness accounts of the Trojan War written by Dares and Dictys Cretensis , who were supposedly present at the events.

These in turn spawned many others in various European languages, such as the first printed English book, the Recuyell of the Historyes of Troye. Other accounts read in the Middle Ages were antique Latin retellings such as the Excidium Troiae and works in the vernaculars such as the Icelandic Troy Saga. Even without Homer, the Trojan War story had remained central to Western European medieval literary culture and its sense of identity. Most nations and several royal houses traced their origins to heroes at the Trojan War.

Homer's Iliad

Britain was supposedly settled by the Trojan Brutus , for instance. William Shakespeare used the plot of the Iliad as source material for his play Troilus and Cressida , but focused on a medieval legend, the love story of Troilus , son of King Priam of Troy, and Cressida , daughter of the Trojan soothsayer Calchas. The play, often considered to be a comedy, reverses traditional views on events of the Trojan War and depicts Achilles as a coward, Ajax as a dull, unthinking mercenary, etc.

William Theed the elder made an impressive bronze statue of Thetis as she brought Achilles his new armor forged by Hephaesthus. Robert Browning 's poem Development discusses his childhood introduction to the matter of the Iliad and his delight in the epic, as well as contemporary debates about its authorship. According to Suleyman al-Boustani , a 19th century poet who made the first Arabic translation of the Iliad to Arabic, the epic may have been widely circulated in Syriac and Pahlavi translations during the early Middle Ages.

Al-Boustani credits Theophilus of Edessa with the Syriac translation, which was supposedly along with the Greek original widely read or heard by the scholars of Baghdad in the prime of the Abbasid Caliphate , although those scholars never took the effort to translate it to the official language of the empire; Arabic. The Iliad was also the first full epic poem to be translated to Arabic from a foreign language, upon the publication of Al-Boustani's complete work in George Chapman published his translation of the Iliad , in installments, beginning in , published in "fourteeners", a long-line ballad metre that "has room for all of Homer's figures of speech and plenty of new ones, as well as explanations in parentheses.

At its best, as in Achilles' rejection of the embassy in Iliad Nine; it has great rhetorical power". In the preface to his own translation, Pope praises "the daring fiery spirit" of Chapman's rendering, which is "something like what one might imagine Homer, himself, would have writ before he arrived at years of discretion". John Ogilby 's mid-seventeenth-century translation is among the early annotated editions; Alexander Pope 's translation, in heroic couplet, is "The classic translation that was built on all the preceding versions", [81] and, like Chapman's, it is a major poetic work in its own right.

William Cowper 's Miltonic , blank verse edition is highly regarded for its greater fidelity to the Greek than either the Chapman or the Pope versions: "I have omitted nothing; I have invented nothing", Cowper says in prefacing his translation. In the lectures On Translating Homer , Matthew Arnold addresses the matters of translation and interpretation in rendering the Iliad to English; commenting upon the versions contemporarily available in , he identifies the four essential poetic qualities of Homer to which the translator must do justice:. After a discussion of the metres employed by previous translators, Arnold argues for a poetical dialect hexameter translation of the Iliad , like the original.

Perhaps the most fluent of them was by J. Henry Dart [] in response to Arnold". An translation by Samuel Butler was published by Longmans. Butler had read Classics at Cambridge University, graduating during Since , there have been several English translations. Richmond Lattimore 's version is "a free six-beat" line-for-line rendering that explicitly eschews "poetical dialect" for "the plain English of today".

It is literal, unlike older verse renderings. Robert Fitzgerald 's version Oxford World's Classics , strives to situate the Iliad in the musical forms of English poetry. His forceful version is freer, with shorter lines that increase the sense of swiftness and energy.


  1. The No-Cook No-Bake Cookbook 101 Delicious Recipes for When Its Too Hot to Cook.
  2. The Iliad – Homer – Poem: Story, Summary & Analysis?
  3. Medieval Transmission and Beyond.
  4. History Homeric Iliad?

Robert Fagles Penguin Classics , and Stanley Lombardo are bolder than Lattimore in adding dramatic significance to Homer's conventional and formulaic language. Rodney Merrill 's translation University of Michigan Press , not only renders the work in English verse like the dactylic hexameter of the original, but also conveys the oral-formulaic nature of the epic song, to which that musical meter gives full value. Barry B. Powell 's translation Oxford University Press , renders the Homeric Greek with a simplicity and dignity reminiscent of the original. Caroline Alexander published the first full-length English translation by a woman in There are more than manuscripts of Homer.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the epic poem. For other uses, see Iliad disambiguation. Epic poem attributed to Homer.

ILIAD AND HISTORICAL TROY

Achilles tending the wounded Patroclus Attic red-figure kylix , c. Main article: List of characters in the Iliad. See also: Category: Deities in the Iliad. Main article: Achilles and Patroclus. Further information: Homeric question and Historicity of the Iliad. Main article: Trojan War in popular culture. Further information: English translations of Homer. Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary. Myrsiades, Kostas. The Iliad.